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Hypertension / High Blood Pressure Guide

Overview & Facts

Hypertension puts you at higher risk for heart disease -- a leading cause of death in the U.S. Learn about hypertension causes, your risks, and prevention.

What Is Hypertension?

Get the basics of blood pressure: Learn what normal blood pressure is, what causes hypertension, who's at risk, and more.

How does your heart beat? How does your blood flow? See what your heart looks like, learn how it works, and more.

Here are eight quick facts you might not know about high blood pressure.

Learn what you do and don't know about high blood pressure with this quiz.

Too much high blood pressure medication is one of the causes of low blood pressure. Get the basics on low blood pressure, from its causes to who's at greater risk.

Causes

Specific causes for hypertension are unknown, but certain factors are known to contribute to high blood pressure. Get an overview of these factors and learn how you might be able to reduce your risk.

Certain medications may cause hypertension. Check the list of medications here.  Is yours on the list?

In about 5% to 10% of people, high blood pressure is caused by another condition, such as chronic kidney disease, pregnancy, and more. Learn which conditions increase your risk of secondary hypertension and how you might be able to reduce that risk.

Could visits to the doctor be causing that spike in your blood pressure? Learn what "white-coat syndrome" is, and get one expert's feedback on what to do if the syndrome happens to you.

Are You at Risk?

The exact cause of hypertension is unknown, but there are several factors and conditions that may contribute to its occurrence. Learn about high blood pressure risk factors here.

High blood pressure is more common in younger men than most believe. Find out why the condition should be taken just as seriously as in their older counterparts.

Robin Adkins is taking part in a new study designed to learn more about the "salt hormone" aldosterone and the genetic connection between hypertension and blacks. Learn if new therapies can block the effects of this hormone.

Today's overweight first-grader is likely to have high blood pressure before finishing high school, according to heart researchers. What can be done to stem this tide? This link will take you to the American Heart Association's web site.

Prevention

Here's a short, quick look at easy lifestyle changes you can make to help keep your blood pressure at a healthy level and reduce your risk of heart disease.

About one in every four American adults has high blood pressure -- also know as hypertension. Learn the simple steps you can take, from maintaining a healthy weight to the dietary supplements that may help.

Related Web Site: Stay Healthy: Know Your Blood Pressure Numbers

What is normal blood pressure? Keeping blood pressure numbers in a healthy range can go a long way toward preventing the No. 1 killer -- heart disease. Find out what's healthy -- and what's risky.

2005-2008 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.
WebMD does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment


Osteoarthritis Guide

Arthritis Basics

What Is Arthritis?

There are over 100 types of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout. The word "arthritis" means "joint inflammation." Inflammation is one of the body's natural reactions to disease or injury, and includes swelling, pain, and stiffness. Inflammation that lasts for a very long time or recurs, as in arthritis, can lead to tissue damage.

Normal Joint

A joint is where two or more bones come together, such as the hip or knee. The bones of a joint are covered with a smooth, spongy material called cartilage, which cushions the bones and allows the joint to move without pain. The joint is lined by a thin film of tissue called the synovium. The synovium's lining produces a slippery fluid called synovial fluid that nourishes the joint and helps reduce friction. Strong bands of tissue, called ligaments, connect the bones and help keep the joint stable. Muscles and tendons also support the joints and enable you to move.

With arthritis, an area in or around a joint becomes inflamed, causing pain, stiffness and, sometimes, difficulty moving. Some types of arthritis also affect other parts of the body, such as the skin and internal organs.

Types of Arthritis

There are more than 100 different types of arthritis. Some of the more common types include:

  • Osteoarthritis . This is the most common type of arthritis. It occurs when the cartilage covering the end of the bones gradually wears away. Without the protection of the cartilage, the bones begin to rub against each other and the resulting friction leads to pain and swelling. Osteoarthritis can occur in any joint, but most often affects the hands and weight-bearing joints such as the knee, hip and facet joints (in the spine). Osteoarthritis often occurs as the cartilage breaks down, or degenerates, with age. For this reason, osteoarthritis is sometimes called degenerative joint disease.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis . Rheumatoid arthritis is a long-lasting disease that can affect joints in any part of the body but most commonly the hands, wrists, and knees. With rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system -- the body's defense system against disease -- mistakenly attacks itself and causes the joint lining to swell. The inflammation then spreads to the surrounding tissues, and can eventually damage cartilage and bone. In more severe cases, rheumatoid arthritis can affect other areas of the body, such as the skin, eyes, and nerves.
  • Gout . Gout is a painful condition that occurs when the body cannot eliminate a natural substance called uric acid. The excess uric acid forms needle-like crystals in the joints that cause swelling and severe pain. Gout most often affects the big toe, knee and wrist joints.

What Are the Symptoms of Arthritis?

Different types of arthritis have different symptoms and the symptoms vary in severity from person to person. Osteoarthritis does not generally cause any symptoms outside the joint. Symptoms of other types of arthritis may include fatigue, fever, a rash and the signs of joint inflammation, including:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Stiffness
  • Tenderness
  • Redness
  • Warmth

2005-2008 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.
WebMD does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment


 

Home Feedback Contents Search

Send mail to administrator@drfaithgray.com with questions or comments about this web site.
Copyright 2008 Faith M Gray, M.D.
Last modified: August 14, 2008
 
Medical Updates

Medical Updates


Feedback Contents Search

Our site has moved to:  WWW.LILBURNINTERNALMEDICINE.COM

 

Home
Current Topics
Health Alerts
Physician's Corner


Hypertension / High Blood Pressure Guide

Overview & Facts

Hypertension puts you at higher risk for heart disease -- a leading cause of death in the U.S. Learn about hypertension causes, your risks, and prevention.

What Is Hypertension?

Get the basics of blood pressure: Learn what normal blood pressure is, what causes hypertension, who's at risk, and more.

How does your heart beat? How does your blood flow? See what your heart looks like, learn how it works, and more.

Here are eight quick facts you might not know about high blood pressure.

Learn what you do and don't know about high blood pressure with this quiz.

Too much high blood pressure medication is one of the causes of low blood pressure. Get the basics on low blood pressure, from its causes to who's at greater risk.

Causes

Specific causes for hypertension are unknown, but certain factors are known to contribute to high blood pressure. Get an overview of these factors and learn how you might be able to reduce your risk.

Certain medications may cause hypertension. Check the list of medications here.  Is yours on the list?

In about 5% to 10% of people, high blood pressure is caused by another condition, such as chronic kidney disease, pregnancy, and more. Learn which conditions increase your risk of secondary hypertension and how you might be able to reduce that risk.

Could visits to the doctor be causing that spike in your blood pressure? Learn what "white-coat syndrome" is, and get one expert's feedback on what to do if the syndrome happens to you.

Are You at Risk?

The exact cause of hypertension is unknown, but there are several factors and conditions that may contribute to its occurrence. Learn about high blood pressure risk factors here.

High blood pressure is more common in younger men than most believe. Find out why the condition should be taken just as seriously as in their older counterparts.

Robin Adkins is taking part in a new study designed to learn more about the "salt hormone" aldosterone and the genetic connection between hypertension and blacks. Learn if new therapies can block the effects of this hormone.

Today's overweight first-grader is likely to have high blood pressure before finishing high school, according to heart researchers. What can be done to stem this tide? This link will take you to the American Heart Association's web site.

Prevention

Here's a short, quick look at easy lifestyle changes you can make to help keep your blood pressure at a healthy level and reduce your risk of heart disease.

About one in every four American adults has high blood pressure -- also know as hypertension. Learn the simple steps you can take, from maintaining a healthy weight to the dietary supplements that may help.

Related Web Site: Stay Healthy: Know Your Blood Pressure Numbers

What is normal blood pressure? Keeping blood pressure numbers in a healthy range can go a long way toward preventing the No. 1 killer -- heart disease. Find out what's healthy -- and what's risky.

2005-2008 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.
WebMD does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment


Osteoarthritis Guide

Arthritis Basics

What Is Arthritis?

There are over 100 types of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout. The word "arthritis" means "joint inflammation." Inflammation is one of the body's natural reactions to disease or injury, and includes swelling, pain, and stiffness. Inflammation that lasts for a very long time or recurs, as in arthritis, can lead to tissue damage.

Normal Joint

A joint is where two or more bones come together, such as the hip or knee. The bones of a joint are covered with a smooth, spongy material called cartilage, which cushions the bones and allows the joint to move without pain. The joint is lined by a thin film of tissue called the synovium. The synovium's lining produces a slippery fluid called synovial fluid that nourishes the joint and helps reduce friction. Strong bands of tissue, called ligaments, connect the bones and help keep the joint stable. Muscles and tendons also support the joints and enable you to move.

With arthritis, an area in or around a joint becomes inflamed, causing pain, stiffness and, sometimes, difficulty moving. Some types of arthritis also affect other parts of the body, such as the skin and internal organs.

Types of Arthritis

There are more than 100 different types of arthritis. Some of the more common types include:

  • Osteoarthritis . This is the most common type of arthritis. It occurs when the cartilage covering the end of the bones gradually wears away. Without the protection of the cartilage, the bones begin to rub against each other and the resulting friction leads to pain and swelling. Osteoarthritis can occur in any joint, but most often affects the hands and weight-bearing joints such as the knee, hip and facet joints (in the spine). Osteoarthritis often occurs as the cartilage breaks down, or degenerates, with age. For this reason, osteoarthritis is sometimes called degenerative joint disease.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis . Rheumatoid arthritis is a long-lasting disease that can affect joints in any part of the body but most commonly the hands, wrists, and knees. With rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system -- the body's defense system against disease -- mistakenly attacks itself and causes the joint lining to swell. The inflammation then spreads to the surrounding tissues, and can eventually damage cartilage and bone. In more severe cases, rheumatoid arthritis can affect other areas of the body, such as the skin, eyes, and nerves.
  • Gout . Gout is a painful condition that occurs when the body cannot eliminate a natural substance called uric acid. The excess uric acid forms needle-like crystals in the joints that cause swelling and severe pain. Gout most often affects the big toe, knee and wrist joints.

What Are the Symptoms of Arthritis?

Different types of arthritis have different symptoms and the symptoms vary in severity from person to person. Osteoarthritis does not generally cause any symptoms outside the joint. Symptoms of other types of arthritis may include fatigue, fever, a rash and the signs of joint inflammation, including:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Stiffness
  • Tenderness
  • Redness
  • Warmth

2005-2008 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.
WebMD does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment


 

Home Feedback Contents Search

Send mail to administrator@drfaithgray.com with questions or comments about this web site.
Copyright 2008 Faith M Gray, M.D.
Last modified: August 14, 2008